LATEST GRANTS

Kenya63.82%
Zambia24.92%
South Africa5.83%
Other5.42%

YOUR DONATIONS

In 2020, your donations went towards four key activities: ranger support through training and equipment, rhino protection and biological management, community outreach, and projects to stop illegal wildlife markets. Below is a breakdown of every grant made since May 2020. 

October 2021

Way Kambas National Park

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation (the second of three installments) was allocated to the reafforestation project around the western boundary of Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra, Indonesia.

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Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism

$43,000.00 from the Woodtiger Fund was allocated to Namibia’s Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism for its annual rhino translocation budgets. This was the second part of a 2-year grant that totaled $100,000. Year 2 funding will be used to pay for staff rations while in the field, for items of equipment used in the field (e.g. circular saw blades), and for tires, fuel and maintenance for the Rhino Recovery (veterinary) Vehicle and the 6×6 trucks used to translocate rhinos.

FOR RANGERS

$250,705.00 was sent to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya. $250,000.00 of this came from an anonymous individual, who had taken part in a fundraising event organized by For Rangers; the other $705.00 was raised by Sam Taylor, one of For Rangers’ founders, who will be taking part in the Gaucho Derby in March 2022 in Patagonia.

September 2021

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SAVE THE RHINO TRUST NAMIBIA

$500.00 was donated by Christina Lui for Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. This will be used to help pay for rations for Save the Rhino Trust’s own trackers and for the Rhino Rangers from community conservancies on which the Kunene Region’s population of desert-adapted black rhinos are found.

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Borana Conservancy

$5,000 (the second of a 2-part grant totaling $10,000 from WildArk) went to Borana Conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya, to help pay for a new environmental education bus (see July grants.)

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Way Kambas National Park

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation (the first of three instalments) was allocated to the reafforestation project around the western boundary of Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra, Indonesia. While Way Kambas is one of the last remaining viable habitats for the Sumatran rhino – illegal logging, farming and hunting have already destroyed one-third of its rainforest habitat. To boost the number of Sumatran rhinos, it’s essential that we increase breeding efforts, but in the long-term, we must also secure places for these rhinos to go. Restoring previously degraded habitat is often the best approach. This project pays local farmers grow the new seedlings to replant the site, and people from nearby villages are hired to plant seedlings, maintain the area, and later harvest browse from mature trees to feed rhinos at the nearby Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. Around the edge of the forest, bordering the village, local people can plant fruit trees that they can later harvest for themselves or to sell. At each site, the project hires staff to manage the program, assigns rangers to guard the sites, builds small wooden guard posts, and digs deep wells to provide water for the nursery and the growing seedlings. They also install water pumps and water tanks, and dig fire breaks around the sites to prevent forest fires from spreading.

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FOR RANGERS

$705.00 was sent to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya, raised by Sam Taylor, one of For Rangers’ founders, who will be taking part in the Gaucho Derby in March 2022 in Patagonia.

August 2021

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Borana Conservancy

$30,000 received from the Holtzman Wildlife Foundation, the second instalment of a 2-year grant totaling $60,000) was sent to Borana Conservancy in Kenya for the water reticulation project, which aims to expand the area used by Borana’s growing black rhino population. The provision of additional water sources has already resulted in rhinos moving into areas that were previously under-utilized.

$5,000 from The Taliaferro Family Fund went to Borana Conservancy in Kenya to help pay for ongoing operating costs.

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Wildlife Crime Prevention

$27,000.00 was awarded from core funds to Wildlife Crime Prevention, a non-profit based in Zambia, to pay for investigations into traffickers operating between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, which will enable government agencies to conduct successful law-enforcement operations in order to disrupt key trade routes, deter traffickers and reduce local demand.

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Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park

$13,500.00 was awarded from core funds to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, to cover the cost of the rhino monitor’s salary and vehicle running costs during the calendar year 2022. The rhino monitor’s collection and analysis of rhino-sighting data will enable the Park management to analyze the performance of the black and white rhino populations.

$77,000.00 was awarded by the Woodtiger Fund to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa. $17,711 of this was allocated to basic vehicle and infrastructure maintenance, including the purchase of new vehicle ties. $42,239 was to buy a new Massey Ferguson tractor for road and fence-line maintenance in the Park. And the remaining $17,050 was allocated for annual black rhino ear-notching operations, scheduled for October 2021. Ear-notching increases the rhino monitor’s ability to ID individual animals and build the demographic database to analyze population performance.

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African Rhino Specialist Group

$16,000.00 was awarded from core funds to help pay the part-time salary of the new position of Program Officer for the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group. Keitumetse Mosweu (known as Kate) took up her role in mid-September 2021 and works closely with the Chair, Dr Mike Knight, and Scientific Officer, Dr Sam Ferreira, to support the Group’s coordination work.

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Ol Jogi Conservancy

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya. This was the third of three instalments of a grant for Ol Jogi that will pay for the construction of two rangers’ houses (see June grants).

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FOR RANGERS

$113.87 was sent to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya, raised by Sam Taylor, one of For Rangers’ founders, who will be taking part in the Gaucho Derby in March 2022 in Patagonia.

July 2021

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Ol Jogi Conservancy

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya. This was the second of three instalments of a grant for Ol Jogi that will pay for the construction of two rangers’ houses (see June grants).

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FOR RANGERS

$46.25 received in restricted donations was allocated to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya.

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Borana Conservancy

$5,000 (the first of a 2-part grant totaling $10,000 from WildArk) went to Borana Conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya, to help pay for a new environmental education bus. Borana has run the Borana Education Support Program for many years now, which helps pay for student bursaries and teacher salaries; the ambition is to be able to bring community groups onto the Conservancy itself and introduce them to the wildlife conservation efforts and livestock-to-market program first-hand. Borana has completed a survey to look at the social impact of protected areas in order to better understand how the Conservancy’s activities affect those of its neighbors.

June 2021

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FORRANGERS

$150,000.00 from an anonymous donor, who has given previously, was awarded to the For Rangers initiative, for onwards granting to beneficiary field programs. For Rangers’ priority is ranger welfare, and grants support medical care and life insurance, uniforms, physical and mental wellbeing, and equipment. To a lesser extent, grants may also be used to improve living standards for rangers while on site, pay for training, and to respond to emergency needs. For Rangers has just paid for renewal of a life-insurance policy for 1,300 rangers in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Nigeria; the ultimate aim is to cover 2,000 rangers in sub-Saharan Africa.

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BORANA CONSERVANCY

$962.70 from James Lewin Photography was allocated to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, to help cover general conservancy operating costs. The Covid-19 pandemic has reduced international tourism to almost zero, meaning that private, community and state parks and conservancies alike are more reliant on philanthropy than usual.

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OL JOGI CONSERVANCY

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya. This was the first of three instalments of a grant for Ol Jogi that will pay for the construction of two rangers’ houses. Back in 2019, Ol Jogi embarked on renovating and constructing new ranger accommodation. Initially, the Conservation Manager, Jamie Gaymer, had intended to renovate rangers’ stations’ roofs, as many were leaking. However, on further inspection, Ol Jogi’s Conservation Manager and Workshop Manager identified that many of the houses were actually structurally damaged. Most of the rangers’ houses had been built in the 1980s, comprised of a combination of local sand and cement with thatched roofs, and were in danger of becoming completely uninhabitable. There was little point putting a new roof on houses that might collapse and were otherwise sub-standard. It was therefore decided to build new houses. Those already completed have proven to be a great success. The houses include a kitchen and shower facility, as well as a new ablution block with a septic tank and soak pit. (Previously, rangers’ stations had long-drops, which were neither sustainable nor ecologically friendly.) The houses have been fitted with lights and electrical sockets, running off solar power and batteries. All of these improvements have had a huge positive impact for rangers, who previously had to endure leaking, structurally damaged stations. They now have dry, safe places to properly relax and rest, so they can go out on their next patrol refreshed and ready to face the challenges their work may present.

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ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTIGATION AGENCY

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in the UK. This was the third of three installments for a 3-year project entitled “Strengthening legal and policy frameworks in China” (see March 2021 for more details).

April 2021

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SAVE THE RHINO TRUST

$3,500.00 from an anonymous donor went to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover the work of SRT’s Wildlife Crime Coordinator, who works closely with colleagues in other agencies to gather and analyze intelligence from informers

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ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTIGATION AGENCY, UK

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in the UK. This was the second of three installments for a 3-year project entitled “Strengthening legal and policy frameworks in China”. The EIA will advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations.

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FORRANGERS

$1,000.00 from Heidi and David Welch for the For Rangers initiative, for the Masai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association, in response to the 2020 MARAthon held as a fundraiser.

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FORRANGERS

$30,000.00 from the Sidekick Foundation for the For Rangers initiative, to help pay for the management of a new organization, ANI Partners Ltd, that will coordinate the management of Lolldaiga and Ole Naishu Conservancies, and more dynamic conservation-development-focused cooperation with key neighboring properties including Mukugodo Forest, Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy and Makurian Group Ranch.

March 2021

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HLUHLUWE-IMFOLOZI PARK

$5,666.00 from the Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation was awarded to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The funds will be used to help pay for vehicle tires, vehicle maintenance, ranger accommodation and ablution blocks repairs, small tools and equipment etc.

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ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTIGATION AGENCY, UK

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in the UK. This was the first of three installments for a 3-year project; see April 2021 for more details.

February 2021

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RHINO PROTECTION UNITS

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to help cover the costs of the Rhino Protection Unit (RPU) program in Ujung Kulon NP, Java. This was the third of three installments totaling $10,500. Today, there are 74 Javan rhinos, living in one population in Ujung Kulon National Park, and fewer than 80 Sumatran rhinos, scattered between a number of forest locations in Sumatra. It is only thanks to the dedication of the RPUs that these rhinos survive today, that their numbers are protected and their populations can begin to grow. Each RPU consists of four highly motivated and trained local rangers, who patrol the rhino areas in order to destroy snares and traps, apprehend poachers, and act as a deterrent to those who might consider undertaking wildlife crime. They can also use intelligence operations to proactively stop poaching attempts, in cooperation with the police. This type of patrolling is necessarily funded by external parties as the authorities managing the parks cannot afford such intensive patrolling efforts. Any rhino poaching incidents – with population numbers so low – could be devastating to conservation efforts and the future of the two species. The funding for RPUs supported salaries and benefits as well as operations, transportation, equipment and guard post maintenance.

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BORANA CONSERVANCY

$44,000.00 from Ardea Cares for Borana Conservancy in Kenya. One of the most critical funding priorities for the conservation management team at Borana Conservancy was the need for a new vehicle for its ranger security team. Borana’s current two Landrovers, which are being used by the Anti-Poaching Unit, are now ~eight years old, and the maintenance required to keep them operational is becoming economically non-viable. The urgent priority was therefore to buy at least one new replacement vehicle, complete with bush modifications to make them robust and fit-for-purpose. In order to carry Rapid Response teams, these security vehicles are fitted with a longitudinal bench seat facing outwards, a roll cage that supports a canopy, and a roof rack over the cabin for carrying kit / equipment that enable each unit to remain in the field unsupported for up to 10 days. On the front and sides of the vehicle, further protection is added so that the bodywork is not damaged in the event that the vehicle has to go off-road to support a casualty evacuation or access an area to support a wildlife vet intervention. Specialized digital radio communication stations are fitted to the new vehicle, to enable the security team to safely coordinate operations during emergencies.

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UMKHUZE GAME RESERVE

$17,400.00 from Ardea Cares for uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa. uMkhuze’s Conservation Manager, Eduard Goosen, plans to implement a three-year annual ranger training program across the Reserve to ensure that rangers are well-trained in field skills, tactics, armed contacts, as well as First Aid and other essential skills. Rangers risk their lives every day to protect the world’s rhino populations and their job is becoming increasingly challenging due to the ever-present threat of poaching. It has never been more important for the rangers to be properly trained and equipped to deal with these potentially dangerous and life-threatening situations. With these additional layers of support, uMkhuze’s black and white rhinos will be much better protected against the ever-present threat of poaching. A comprehensive ranger training plan has now been developed in collaboration with a training provider, Conservation Outcomes, for the next three years. Specifically, this grant is helping to cover two training courses to be held in 2021: the Basic Key Field Skills Course and the Patrol Leaders’ Course.

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ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTIGATION AGENCY, UK

$2,782.80 from Ardea Cares for the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in the UK. See April grants for more details.

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FORRANGERS

$10,000.00 from March to the Top was awarded to the For Rangers initiative, for onwards granting to beneficiary field programs. For Rangers’ priority is ranger welfare, and grants support medical care and life insurance, uniforms, physical and mental wellbeing, and equipment. To a lesser extent, grants may also be used to improve living standards for rangers while on site, pay for training, and to respond to emergency needs

January 2021

Borana Conservancy

$2,105.00 from Johnny Beveridge was awarded to Borana Conservancy’s Days for Girls appeal, to pay for menstrual kits, distributed via the Borana Mobile Clinic and Community Development Office to female students in the Borana Education Support Program. Each $10 donation includes a kit demonstration and an Ambassador of Women Health training from Pauline, the Borana Mobile Clinic nurse. The training will teach girls about their body development, menstrual cycle, menstrual hygiene and other reproductive health issues.

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Association of Private and community Land Sanctuaries

$50,012.00 from WildAid for the Core Critical Operations Costs appeal, developed on behalf of the Association of Private and community Land Sanctuaries (APLRS) in Kenya in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. This was shared between the seven Members of the APLRS (Big Life Foundation, Borana Conservancy, Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Ol Jogi Conservancy, Ol Pejeta Conservancy and Sera Wildlife Conservancy) to help cover the salaries of security staff and associated staff costs, vehicle fuel and maintenance costs for patrol purposes, flying time (helicopter and fixed-wing, as a deterrent to incursions and reaction to any threats), and other essential costs, including: canine units; intelligence gathering and analysis; a proportion of management staff (reduced) salaries; electricity / power, water, fence and road maintenance for security purposes; communications (again security-related) and any emergency vet interventions required. All these security-related activities must continue, if the conservancies and the wildlife they nurture are to survive.

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Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area

$3,500.00 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia. This was the second of three installments; see February 2021 for more details.

December 2020

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JAVAN RHINO STUDY AND CONSERVATION AREA

$3,500 to the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia. The second of three monthly grants from the Scott & Jessica McClintock Foundation will be used to help pay for the Rhino Protection Unit program in Ujung Kulon NP, home to the world’s only population of Javan Rhinos (see August 2020).

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FOR RANGERS

$4,800 to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya. This donation from Gary and Mary Pinkus, made in support of the 2020 MARAthon, went to the Masai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association.

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NORTH LUANGWA CONSERVATION PROGRAM

$220,885.10 to the North Luangwa Conservation Program in Zambia. This latest installment from the Wildcat Foundation is part of the Foundation’s 2-year grant that covers a number of different aspects of NLCP’s protection and law-enforcement work in North Luangwa National Park (see March 2020).

November 2020

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JAVAN RHINO STUDY AND CONSERVATION AREA

$3,500 to the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia. The first of three monthly grants from the Scott & Jessica McClintock Foundation will be used to help pay for the Rhino Protection Unit program in Ujung Kulon NP, home to the world’s only population of Javan Rhinos (see August 2020.)

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FOR RANGERS

$1,500 to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya. This donation from Ernie and Diane Burgess, made in support of the 2020 MARAthon, went to the Masai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association.

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MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND TOURISM

$57,000 to the Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism in Namibia. This is the first part of a 2-year grant from the Woodtiger Fund (total $100,000), for a new Rhino Recovery Vehicle (a Toyota Landcruiser V8 single-cab) and modifications (tough guard panels, line-x loadbin, stainless-steel surround on tailgate, rear replacement bumper with double spare-wheel carriers, fridge bracket in the front cab, and labor for the modifications carried out), used in MEFT’s annual planned and emergency rhino translocation and immobilization operations.

October 2020

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ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE LAND RHINO SANCTUARIES

$400,000 to the APLRS For Rangers initiative in Kenya. This donation, from an anonymous donor went to the AgWild project: the formation of a conservation beef cooperative that uses specialized and dedicated leadership to coordinate collaboration to achieve the scale that leads to optimized land-use, enhanced and diverse revenue streams, economies of scale and subsequent financial sustainability (see September 2020).

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FOR RANGERS

$12.74 to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya. $12.74 received in misc. restricted donations will help pay for improvements to ranger welfare (see January).

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BORANA CONSERVANCY

$30,000 to Borana Conservancy, Kenya. This grant of $30,000 from the Holtzman Wildlife Foundation for a 2-year water-reticulation project (total award $60,000) will pay for improved water reticulation on the Conservancy. Whilst Borana has a number of dams and pans, these are subject to rains and, although the larger of these hold perennial water, the increased pressure and intra-species competition (particularly between rhino) means that areas surrounding these water points become over-browsed. This affects both habitat and Borana’s Ecological Carrying Capacity for black rhino. As a result, across the Conservancy, there are areas where water reticulation must be improved. By building more water points, constructing pipelines and equipping boreholes with solar power, this project will increase available habitat for young dispersing male black rhinos that are establishing new territories, as well as open up habitat for other species.

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SAVE THE RHINO TRUST, NAMIBIA

$3,500 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. This, the third and last of three monthly installments from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, helped pay for rations and vehicle fuel and running costs and associated administration costs.

September 2020

FOR RANGERS

$500,000 to the For Rangers initiative in Kenya. This donation, from an anonymous donor went to the AgWild project: the formation of a conservation beef cooperative that uses specialized and dedicated leadership to coordinate collaboration to achieve the scale that leads to optimized land-use, enhanced and diverse revenue streams, economies of scale and subsequent financial sustainability. The cooperative comprises Ol Maisor Ranch, Sosian Ranch, Suyian, Loisaba Conservancy and Mugie Conservancy, five contiguous properties in Northern Laikipia, representing more than 200,000 acres of both critical wildlife habitat and food and revenue generation for the county of Laikipia.

SAVE THE RHINO TRUST, NAMIBIA

$3,500 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. This, the second of three monthly installments from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, helped pay for rations and vehicle fuel and running costs and associated administration costs.

$975 was also awarded to Save the Rhino International, thanks to donations made in response to its ‘On the Edge’ appeal for annual funds.

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